Installing a life-line - Petzl USA
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Installing a life-line

Warnings

  • Read the technical notice before viewing the following techniques.
  • It is important to fully understand the information provided in the technical notice before using this complementary information
  • Mastering these techniques requires training.
  • Consult a professional before attempting to perform these techniques on your own.

Installing a life-line is a dangerous operation, especially due to the great risk of a pendulum fall.

For this type of installation, the ASAP offers certain advantages, but requires specific precautions:


Advantages:

- Hands are free to manage the progression

- The user can quickly create enough slack to make knots, thanks to the sliding of the rope in the ASAP, while optimizing the rope tension during movement phases

Warning

Disadvantages:

In case of a pendulum fall on the ASAP, clearance is difficult to assess. It is greater than that from a simple pendulum on a rope

The clearance consists of:

- The rope length deployed since the last anchor, and its elasticity

- The possible tearing of the energy absorber

- The engagement distance of the ASAP, which can be longer than for a fall in clear space (the ASAP is not immediately tensioned in a pendulum)



When suspended on the ASAP after a fall, the user or their teammate must install another system for evacuation.

Precautions:

- Always keep the ASAP's rope under tension, without any slack

When tying a knot, slack must be created. The ASAP must then considered to be deactivated: the user must have a backup system (lanyard on the anchor, for example)

- Always stay below the anchor points

- Whenever possible, use a backup system on a high point that reduces the pendulum risk

- The user must carry out a risk analysis before committing. It must specifically address the spacing of the anchor points and the pendulum risk, and assess the necessary clearance in case of a fall

1. Example of an installation technique when there is a low risk of falling:

Progression:

The blue rope is installed as a life-line, the rope moving through the ASAP allows slack to be avoided.

Tying a knot:

User in tension on the lanyard connected to an anchor. The user makes enough slack above the ASAP to tie the knot. The ASAP is ready for the next progression stage.

Advantages:

- User autonomy

Disadvantages:

- Limits progression to closely-spaced anchors and to situations with a low risk of falling

Installing a progression life-line 01
Installing a progression life-line 01

2. Example of installation technique with a teammate providing a backup belay at the anchor:

Progression:

The blue rope is installed as a life-line, the rope moving through the ASAP allows slack to be avoided. Backup belay on the gray rope with a belayer at the anchor.

Tying a knot:

The user is in tension on his lanyard and always backed up by the gray rope. The user makes enough slack above the ASAP to tie the knot. The ASAP is ready for the next progression stage.

Advantages:

- Speed and hands-free progression

- Pre-installed system for teammate assist

Disadvantages:

- Managing multiple ropes passing through the anchors

Installing a progression life-line 02
Installing a progression life-line 02

9.3. Pendulum fall tests

Tests carried out with a 100 kg mass, an ASAP'SORBER 40, ASAP installed on a new AXIS 11 mm rope, and a figure-8 knot at the anchor point.

Start of the fall: mass positioned 3 m from the anchor point, with 3 m of rope deployed (the length of the ASAP'SORBER + 2 connectors creates a slight loop of slack).

The same fall was repeated three times under identical conditions.

Installing a test life-line
Installing a test life-line

Principal results:

ASAP engagement distance: 21 to 32 cm.

Complete tearing of the ASAP'SORBER 40.

Rope intact, ASAP to be retired.

Mass stopped 4.30 m below the anchor point (add the height of the user and a safety margin to calculate the necessary clearance).

During the pendulum, the mass reached a point opposite the anchor, more than 3.50 m from it.

This test was repeated multiple times to be able to record average values, however the results obtained are given for information only.

With the ASAP'SORBER 40, 3 m seems to be the maximum acceptable distance between the anchors.

Consider this information, in the context of your environment, when doing your risk analysis.