Litter hauling techniques - Petzl USA
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Litter hauling techniques

All maneuvers must be done on two independent rope systems. These two systems can work in parallel (two haul lines) or separately (work rope and belay rope).

Warnings

  • Read the technical notice before viewing the following techniques.
  • It is important to fully understand the information provided in the technical notice before using this complementary information
  • Mastering these techniques requires training.
  • Consult a professional before attempting to perform these techniques on your own.

1. Example of hauling with work rope and belay rope.

All hauling and positioning forces are concentrated on the work rope. The belay rope is installed to hold the load in case of work rope or anchor failure.

Example of hauling with work rope and belay rope 1/2
Example of hauling with work rope and belay rope 2/2
Example of hauling with work rope and belay rope 2/2
 
  • Quick and simple installation, only one haul system needed.
  • Only one system is under tension, the belay system is less vulnerable to a risk of rope failure.
  • Two different systems may be used, for example a mechanical haul system (winch...).
  • Configuration suited to small work spaces.
  • If the work rope breaks, load displacement can be significant due to stretch in the belay rope.
  • Risk of developing slack in the belay rope by focusing too much on the primary system.
  • Risk of neglecting the quality of the belay system set-up. Warning: this system must be fully operational at any time!

2. Example of hauling with two haul lines

The two ropes have the same function and work in parallel.

Example of hauling with two haul lines 1/2
Example of hauling with two haul lines 2/2
Example of hauling with two haul lines 2/2
 
  • With good coordination, it's possible to haul a heavy load even with simple systems.
  • If one rope breaks, the other is already tensioned to hold the load, reducing the amount of clearance required.
  • It is possible to manage a complex litter route if the rope paths are anticipated.
  • Load sharing between the two ropes is never perfect; sometimes one rope holds the entire load; good coordination of team members is required.
  • Both ropes are tensioned and so more vulnerable to breakage.
  • Requires more equipment and room for installation.