Emily Harrington

Emily Harrington - photo © J. Roth
Emily Harrington profile - photo © J. Evans

USA

USA
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Photo portrait: 
Emily Harrington – photo: © Justin Roth
Date de naissance: 
17 August 1986
Lieu de résidence: 
Berkley, California
Formation: 
International Affairs
Statut actuel: 
Professional climber
Date d'entrée dans le Team Petzl: 
2002

Climbing is a lifelong journey
Climbing is a unique sport because it is also a lifestyle and a lifelong journey. There is always a new place to visit, a new style to learn, a new way to experience climbing and explore the world. For example, I climbed an artificial wall when I was 10 and begged my dad to take me to the climbing gym after that. Since then, I have primarily sport climbed, but more recently I’ve gotten into mixed and ice climbing, as well as some minimal mountaineering (summited Everest and Mt. Blanc in 2012).

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Finding a balance
I like running and more recently have discovered skiing again after quitting at age 13 to pursue climbing. I don't enjoy only climbing all the time and prefer to have a balance, which can be hard to find when one's job title is "professional climber." I also enjoy writing and reading to escape and go into my own world when I'm traveling and heavily immersed in climbing.

 

Where to climb? Where to live?
Spain, of course, is my favorite spot for sport climbing, because it's just that good. I love visiting the Himalaya, in Nepal, because of its insane beauty and rich culture. I just recently moved to California to live because, in my opinion, it has everything: good weather, beaches, and mountains.

 

Sources of inspiration
I find strength, energy, and inspiration through traveling, meeting people, having adventures, and experiencing new cultures. Sasha DiGiulian is also an inspiration for stepping it up for all females and doing what she loves without concerning herself with negativity. I consider Conrad Anker, our team captain on The North Face Team, to be a mentor. He's a badass and loves what he does. I was on Everest with him this past spring. I've never seen someone so psyched to be suffering. He's passionate and motivated to share his love for the outdoors, which I think it super inspiring.

 

Personal motto 
Do not accept unwanted advice; write your own story. 

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François Damilano

Francois Damilano profile - photo © Bertrand Delapierre
Francois Damilano profile - photo © Bertrand Delapierre

France

FRA
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Photo portrait: 
Francois Damilano - photo © Bertrand Delapierre
Date de naissance: 
30 December 1959
Lieu de résidence: 
Chamonix (France)
Formation: 
State degree in special education, Mountain guide
Statut actuel: 
Mountain guide, writer, filmmaker
Date d'entrée dans le Team Petzl: 
1985

Desire and ambition: a long-term relationship
«I had the chance to experience the golden age of ice climbing and I still love to climb at the end of a valley in full winter. My life as an alpinist has been marked with an indelible seal by the world of ice climbing.  In the early eighties, I found a synthesis between sport climbing and alpinism, two practices that tended to be differentiated by separate worlds. In ice climbing, I found the movement and the pleasure of rock climbing combined with the mastery of risky terrain that is important to an alpinist. In ice climbing, I have also made some great friendships with those tied into the other end of a rope.
The image had a strong influence on me and I love to try to carry the aesthetic of a mountain that has beaten me, or escape from a line that has made an impact on me. After that it’s the stories of companionship. Those with photographers and filmmakers. Their skills have taught me to look for the best light, select the material, transcend the impatience of a climber. It’s a way to not get locked inside the intemperance of the performance. In a photograph or film, this manifests itself as the choice of the best framing to elicit an emotion, of an angle used to tell a story, for many people to see, or simply as a way to keep a memory for a few moments of our lives as climbers. Finally, later, now, to dare to make my films from behind the camera and show things differently. Perfect my view, refine the dialogue, try to let others tell their stories by combining my mountaineering experience with my passion for the image. More than stories of climbing, I love the stories of climbers.»

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See further...
«I have climbed for quite awhile now… and, as in climbing, my journey is marked by a few key passages. Feelings of discovery emerge, the satisfactions of performance, the complicities of friendship, tears from dramas and the joy of motivation. Years forced to take a turn: the loss of recklessness. It’s perhaps because of this that today I am trying to keep from locking myself in my own caricature. Certainly, the practice of ice climbing is a ‘big part’ of my life as an alpinist, but it has also allowed me to go beyond that, to see differently and to learn from practices other than my own. Without being a writer nor a filmmaker… I have actually spent a lot of time making books and films. Today, I focus my guiding practice on the people I am with, at very high altitude, which forces me to explore other ideas and take a necessary step back from the practice of the sport, in my practice of the sport. Today, breathing life into a publishing house (JMéditions) is a way to use my pen to hatch the writing projects of others. The author publisher relationship is also like a climbing partnership. Today, to swap my ice tools for a camera is to walk away from the role of a climber ‘who takes the stage’ to talk about something new and give birth to the narrative. To find the angle of a story is to sharpen the critical analysis and not be soothed by convention.
Today, I continue to live my childhood dreams fuelled by the stories of Rebuffat, Terray and Desmaison. Their books and films inspire me to leave my comfort zone. I have always been sensitive to those who find the ability to juggle their passion (climber), their work (mountain guide) and the taste for publishing.»

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Diaporama Photos: 
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Francois Damilano - photo Bertrand Delapierre
 
 
 
 
Francois Damilano - photo Bertrand Delapierre

Audrey Gariepy

Audrey Gariepy profile - © Cory Richards
Audrey Gariepy profile - © Dan Elridge

Canada

CAN
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Photo portrait: 
Audrey Gariepy - © Cory Richards
Date de naissance: 
3 September 1979
Lieu de résidence: 
St-Jean-Chrysostome (Quebec)
Formation: 
Sports teacher
Statut actuel: 
Foreman for Celtic Reforestation
Date d'entrée dans le Team Petzl: 
2008

A lifestyle choice
«I graduated from university in 2002 and was planning to become a sports teacher. However, I began climbing during my last few years of school and by the time I finished school I was completely addicted to the climbing lifestyle. So instead of looking for a job as a teacher I decided to buy a van and go looking for adventure. In order to make a living and to pay for my trips I began working in the forest planting trees during the summer. It’s been eight years since I chose this lifestyle. Time has passed and I am now a foreman and for three or four months every summer I work with a team of 16 planters. This enables me to have the free time to do what I love most.»

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«As the years have passed climbing has become more than just a hobby. Everything I do seems to have a connection to climbing: the seasonal work that I chose was originally so that I would have more time to climb and travel. Now, it’s impossible to imagine what my life would be like without climbing. In life, I think it’s important to live every moment of every day. It’s obvious that most of us will grow old and that we must think about this as well, but that should not be the guiding force in our lives. Climbing allows me to appreciate every little moment. It helps me focus on the here and now. During the autumn I climb as much as I can to get in shape. Then when winter arrives I go as often as I can to the Canadian Rockies, to a paradise of ice in the heart of these magnificent mountains, to take advantage of the long ice climbing season there.»
 
Another important thing in my life
«TO BE is more important than TO HAVE.
I am happy I don’t have too many material things.
Of course, climbing gear doesn’t count. ;-) »
 
Feeling alive
«I have always felt a strong need to play outside. When I was a kid, my parents struggled to keep me inside, especially in the winter when it was cold outside. When I started rock climbing in 1999 I immediately loved the feeling I got from this new activity: to be outdoors, to focus on every movement, and to be aware of everything around me. It seems to me that everything I previously worked on in my life has made me a better climber. When I was in college during the winter I had to climb indoors. I loved that time but after a year I needed to get outside more often. That’s why I started to ice climb, which satisfied my love for climbing and the outdoors during the long Canadian winter. I became addicted very quickly. There are so many new places to explore and techniques to learn... I love getting up early in the morning and driving while it is still dark, half asleep and listening to music, making the approach by headlamp while watching the sun slowly rise, and then arriving at the base of the route. Nothing in life gives me that same feeling of being alive as ice climbing. I am completely focused on the first and last movement, aware of the sounds that my ice tools and crampons make, aware of everything around me. I don’t have time to think about what I’m going to eat for dinner and, in any case, I won’t be home in time to cook. It’s a feeling that’s both quiet and intense. Of course, when I’m fully exposed to the cold wind and freezing my derriere at a belay, or when the blood finally returns to my fingers after a long cold spell, I sometimes ask myself why I love this so much. Fortunately, I quickly forget as soon as I look at everything around me. I feel so small in the middle of these giant, snow-covered mountains. I am so lucky to be there and doing what I am doing.»
 
Planting trees
«When I am not climbing, I love snowkiting, working with wood, reading, watching movies... and eating ice cream. However, my work represents a big part of my life. From April through July, I am responsible for a strong team of planters and together we plant around 30,000 trees per day. The days last close to 15 hours so I don’t have much time for climbing. But my work represents another of my passions and I love this short break from climbing.»
 
My favorite places
«I love to travel in the northern Canadian territories. The people there are very proud of the place where they live. It seems like time passes more slowly there and that everyone talks about this place with stars in their eyes. Another place I really like is Nepal. The people from the Khumbu valley really impress me. They carry and build everything with their hands. Simply to bring fruit to their village it is necessary for them to leave Lukla for several days. I was very impressed by their mental and physical strength, just like the giant, endless mountains that surround them. I should also mention Iceland because this country is also so incredible. When Inès Papert and I were there we had really good luck with the weather and we could climb as much as we wanted. We even climbed 1000 meters of vertical ice in a day. But if I was forced to choose only one place, it would have to be Norway. I get a big smile every time I think about my trip there in February 2008 with Guy Lacelle, Mathieu Audibert, Chris Alstrin and Alex Lavigne. Our timing was perfect and there was so much ice to climb. Driving along the fjords, through tunnels, high into the mountains and then down again… it was magic to be there with someone as experienced as Guy who guided us to the best places and who radiated positive and contagious energy. The ice was incredible and I think that we made some first ascents (that’s what we thought, anyway). But what made this trip so great was the other people, the guys I travelled with. To be with great people is now more important for me than the destination.»

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Diaporama Photos: 
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I remember
«In 2003, when I had begun working as a tree planter, Guy Lacelle was my foreman. That’s how I first met Guy and working on his team was an honor. He worked as hard as possible every day, always giving his best. Without asking us to do the same, he provided the best example and that encouraged the entire team to give 100 %. Rain or shine, he was always happy to work. He wanted to do something good for the planet and he felt responsible for a great team that planted trees every day. We felt like he was proud of us. The following winter I had the chance to meet Guy in completely different circumstances, in a world that he preferred more than any other: ice climbing. All the qualities that he showed when he was planting trees were present but in a cooler environment. I was still a beginner ice climber and Guy taught me and I quickly improved. He never told me explicitly what to do but he would always tell me things that would make me think and react. Guy was my mentor and an incredible source of inspiration. He could always get the best from everyone.»
Guy Lacelle died in an avalanche in Bozeman, Montana in 2009
 
 

 

Ueli Steck

Ueli Steck profile - photo © coll. U.Steck
Ueli Steck profile - photo © Tony lamiche

Switzerland

CHE
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Photo portrait: 
Ueli Steck profile - © photo coll. U.Steck
Date de naissance: 
4 October 1976
Lieu de résidence: 
Ringgenberg, Switzerland
Formation: 
carpenter
Statut actuel: 
professional mountaineer
Date d'entrée dans le Team Petzl: 
2007

The spirit of climbing
“I grew up close to the mountains and started climbing at 12 years old. I discovered the cliffs alone, by myself, which was a big accomplishment. Mountaineering is the perfect place to think and learn. The rules are simple and very clear. I like that, it’s easy to understand. If you don’t bring a sleeping bag that’s warm enough, you’ll be cold. If you’re not strong enough, you won’t succeed in the ascent. It’s important for me to share the good spirit of climbing with other people. I like to be with people who pay attention to the way they climb. The style, the attitude, the way in which of the ascents areconducted, are all very important facets of a climb.”

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Focus on excellence
“I am a multi-discipline climber. I love rock but also ice and my primary objective is to be at ease in the big mountains, like for example the Himalaya and beyond. I want to be at ease in all facets of climbing in which I may find myself, from the easiest to the most extreme. I love to push myself and test myself against nature, but I do not like to compete against other climbers. My biggest problem is finding the balance between pushing myself enough and risk.  Finding that balance feels a little bit like a game. The important question is ‘How do you weigh this balance?’ and not ‘Why do I risk my life?’ I accept a high level of risk, but within the limits of my ability. Trying to master something that is essentially uncontrollable is not easy to manage. From my experience in the Himalaya I have learned that you have to be very fast while you are on-sighting and climbing in more and more difficult terrain. To me, to master this game seems like a focus on excellence. My primary goal is to strengthen my mental game, and I’m happy to live an intense life. It’s by forging that one becomes a blacksmith. A climber becomes a Himalayan expert step by step. To be able to think of setting speed records while soloing I have to improve at both rock climbing and ice climbing, and above everything else, endurance. I train almost every day just above where I live by running or ski touring 1600 meters of elevation gain.”
 
 
Himalaya
“I like Nepal and the Himalayas a lot. They are real mountains and I like to be there. We have to hike multiple days to arrive at base camp because there are no cars. If we want to go somewhere or visit someone, we goon foot. I like the country’s culture. The people are optimistic even if their life is very hard. In general, I like people with a lot of character. People who actively choose their own lives, not people who follow others.”
 
 
To keep growing
“I need to renew myself regularly and spend some time at home, just to have a few moments of calm and be able to concentrate on a dream. But I am also very determined. If I have an idea, I go for it. My main source of inspiration is a thirst for learning. Knowledge offers freedom. To acquire this knowledge, you have to learn. To be free, you have to be at ease and to be at ease you have to train often and hard. To become proficient in many disciplines, at a high level, you have to understand the sport completely, you have to be passionate and you have to accept, above all, that you might find yourself feeling at times like a beginner, like a student, and to continue to learn. This is important to understand if you wish to be good at many disciplines and your primary objective is success.”
 
 
My motto
“Everything I can imagine, is possible.”
 

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Diaporama Photos: 
Diaporama Videos: 

This video is part of the ReelRockTour - video courtesy of Mountain Hardware
 
 

Video playlist featuring Ueli Steck
Watch Ueli sending "the Secret" (X, 10) during the Scottish Ice Trip in Ben Nevis

 

Sam Beaugey

Sam Beaugey profile - Photo © David Ravanel
Sam Beaugey profile - Photo © Tony Lamiche

France

FRA
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Photo portrait: 
Sam Beaugey - Photo © Collection S.Beaugey
Date de naissance: 
3 June 1971
Lieu de résidence: 
Chamonix, France
Formation: 
ENSA (National Ski and Alpinism School)
Statut actuel: 
mountain guide
Date d'entrée dans le Team Petzl: 
2000

I learned about myself by growing up in the mountains
"My father was a high-mountain guide and he taught me about his mountain. This experience continues to add meaning to my life. The purpose of my own climbing is to conquer the useless, but more importantly to share the essence of the adventure and at the same time respect nature with a big smile and loads of good times. The main value that I share with my climbing partners is commitment. I want to show that mountaineering is not limited to a single discipline, but that it’s lots of different practices and there is always something new to discover. The joy of flying after a nice climb has become essential for me and my goal is to make the descent as significant as the ascent. The most difficult part of that is all the different injuries that come from the landing accidents."

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My circle of family and friends provide a strong foundation
"I am very close to my family and friends and especially my parents because, thanks to them, I can travel to the end of the world. The people I am closest to now are my childhood friends: Jérôme Ruby because he’s Jérôme, Dean Potter because of the dream he is living, my brother for his life that is similar to mine, Erwan Le Lann and Manu Pellissier because these guys are like brothers to me, brothers of the mountain. My inspiration comes naturally through all the other climbers and I have enormous respect for the older generation. They make me dream. I admire them. Through them I have learned to be patient. And in the same way I appreciate the work of all climbers who have contributed to the progression of mountaineering particularly through the development of gear. I think about the pioneers tinkering with their headlamps after a good caving session and I know that it’s because of the dreams of our adventurous fathers that we are able to have our own dreams today."
 
 
An evolutionary process
"It’s obvious to everyone that I participate in the evolution of mountaineering but I am also tuned into gathering all the information - whether it’s about new spots, walls, beta from everyone, and weather forecasts - thanks in part to this incredible medium to exchange and share information called the web. The entire Alps, for example, are an extraordinary playground for kids like us. We can no longer talk about exploring the area itself but we can continue to explore things like techniques and skills in new ways. I don’t consider mountaineering to be an activity, but more like everything that can be done in the mountains. The word ‘everything’ should be understood as being a lot of different activities with each activity having the same level of commitment, positive attitude and good vibes. If I can contribute towards the invention of serious new products for sport that’s not serious, then that’s awesome. Sport is not serious because in the end it has no value in and of itself. However, if it is one of the best schools for learning discipline."
 
 
As if planet Earth was my own backyard
"I don’t think I’m crazy but rather that I have an open frame of mind that allows me to think of planet Earth as my own backyard, or at the very least, as an incredible playground. The places I enjoy most on Earth are the polar regions and the Canadian territories. For example, my wildest dream is to go on a space shuttle and boost a little jump of 20,000 meters off a cliff on Mars. But seriously, an idea that’s more in line with what I do would be to leave for three years to climb from the Antarctic through the Americas to the North Pole then back to Antarctica through Asia and Africa."
 
 
Communicate
"With the Lineprod company we organize events, business seminars and conferences. We also partner with organizations that help kids experience the mountains through events like the ‘Raid Choucas’, a free adventure race for kids from France and Switzerland. Another example of the kind of things we do was during our Antarctic expedition in 2010 when we had online discussions via satellite phone with Swiss and French schools in Vallorcine and Maurienne."
 
 
My motto
"Tell your story and split."
 
 
Sam’s anecdote
"I have always had a special relationship with bears. I have never seen a blue bear but there has been a polar bear near my tent. He took a bath, dried himself, then sat on his haunches and looked at us with a sneer. Another time in western Canada I walked for six hours without water in full winter to get past an avalanche that had blocked the route. There were grizzly tracks and although I never saw him I was afraid every step of the way."

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Video playlist featuring Sam Beaugey :

 

 
Big wall aid climbing in Baffin Island :

 

 
Holtanna Antartica project preparation :

Robert Jasper

Robert Jasper profile - photo © coll. Robert Jasper
Robert Jasper profile - photo © Klaus Fengler

Germany

DEU
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Photo portrait: 
Robert Jasper profile - photo © coll. Robert Jasper
Date de naissance: 
15 April 1968
Lieu de résidence: 
Baden-Wurtemberg, Germany
Statut actuel: 
mountain guide, physical education teacher, training instructor for guides
Date d'entrée dans le Team Petzl: 
2000

My job is to explore nature
“Passion connects people to each other, but it also connects people to nature. The more that people connect to nature, the more they connect with themselves and the more they find their true selves. I am an alpinist who specializes in ice climbing, but I like all disciplines that connect to the mountains. My objective is to develop a modern style of climbing, like for example, the first free ascent of the Japanese-Direct (1800m/8a) on the north face of the Eiger. I consider the climbing on that route to be the most difficult climbing in the Alps. I also want to develop a modern alpine style in foreign places such as the Tierra del Fuego, Baffin Island, Svalbard and the Himalaya.”

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I progress step by step to reach my dream
“I started climbing in the Black Forest, an in southern Germany. I had good rock just outside my doorstep, and was close to the Swiss Alps. In the Alps, my favorite face is the north face of the Eiger. I have experienced endless adventures there so for me it’s a magic location. I also like places like Tierra del Fuego in Patagonia and the Himalaya with their marvelous cultures. In Europe, the south of France is my favorite for its climbing crags. The Black Forest will always be in my backyard as a place to go for walks with my children. It’s always been important to me to leave and come back and leave again and so on. But returning home to the Black Forest to recharge is always important to me, it’s my base camp.”
 
 
Introduction to travel
“My travels are, for me, more than simply a ‘sport’. They are more like a true lifestyle and a passion. When I travel, I meet other people from other countries in a unique way and this enriches my life. The more I share what I have seen, the richer my experience becomes.”
 
 
I love to tell the stories of unusual walls
“During my free time I enjoy my family and my children. When I return home from climbing trips or expeditions, I like to share all of my experiences – through stories, slide shows and events– with everyone who wants to hear. I take the opportunity to share my passion as well as all that I have learned during my adventures. I organize conferences and training for people who come from a different cultural backgrounds or have a different social life. Sharing my lifestyle with others is how I live my life.I try to connect all the different disciplines of mountaineering. And I speak of my personal experiences in relation to all I have learned. I love the public relations aspect of my work. For example, I participate in management training for big companies such as Holcim, ABB, Adidas, etc. which I really enjoy.”
 
 
My motto
“Do what there is to do, but first think about whether or not it is in line with my ethics. Do everything with all my heart, as well as possible.”

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Aljaž Anderle

Aljaz Anderle profile - Photo © Arnaud Childéric
Aljaz Anderle profile - Photo © Guillaume Vallot

Slovenia

SVN
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Photo portrait: 
Aljaz Anderle - Photo © Tony Lamiche
Date de naissance: 
8 June 1973
Lieu de résidence: 
Tržič, Slovenia
Formation: 
University degree in international security
Statut actuel: 
Mountain guide
Date d'entrée dans le Team Petzl: 
2000

Still stoked after twenty years of ice climbing
“The passion for the sport, a love of life, a certain ethic, commitment, a desire to explore, the desire to improve… Climbing gives meaning to my life. In short, that is who I am. Every person carries within himself the opportunity to live a happy life in harmony with what he loves and I try in every way I can to be that kind of person. As such, Petzl has always been an important partner, not only for their sponsorship but also for their friendship and philosophy. I try to explore and push my limits. A bit like the film “Le Grand Bleu”, I tend to look for what’s on the other side to understand the significance of what’s possible and, at the same time, the meaning of life.”

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Has my childhood prepared me for my job as an alpinist?
“No, not really. Both my parents are alpinists but I always wanted to be a pilot. Then I wanted to be a soldier. During my childhood, it was Ayrton Senna who inspired me the most with his willingness to constantly progress (and. as a result, I crashed a few cars…). In addition, if I wasn’t doing what I do now, I would be a pilot. Why? Is there any link between that and my life today? What is it? I don’t know.”
 
A geographical link
“The places where I feel the best are northern Norway, Alberta province in the western Canada, and all of Slovenia. Slovenia is my home. I am emotionally attached to it because it’s possibly one of the most diverse countries on the planet. Although I have traveled extensively, you should understand that I love my country.
In Canada, you always receive a very warm welcome. I love to go back there because of the feeling you get of freedom and immensity, which makes me happy. In Canada you can leave behind the crowds and the hectic lifestyle of Europe.
It’s the same thing in Norway, especially the northern part where man exists hand in hand with nature to create unbelievable scenarios. This combination comes from working creatively in a really difficult environment.”
 
My working relationships
“Financial matters are not the most important thing in my life, but perhaps it’s part of the secret to being happy. I love to be surrounded by true friends. I love to work with partners who show mutual respect and openness. I like to work on a win/win basis, which makes everyone happy. My partners, employers and clients are: the Alpine Association of Slovenia, Mountain Rescue Service, Slovenian Mountain Guide Association, and The School of Rhetorical Skills in Ljubljana.”
 
Inspiration
“I spend a lot of time reading and writing. Douglas Adams, Arthur C. Clarke and Richard Bach are a few of my favorite authors.
My favorite books are:
- “Childhood’s” End by Arthur C. Clarke .(Perhaps there is a future for humanity)
- “Illusions” by Richard Bach. (We are the creators of our own lives.)
- “Fate is the Hunter” by Ernest Gann. (The true story of a pilot who talks about the unpredictable direction that destiny always takes us.)
The two films that have caught my attention the most are:
- “Blade Runner”. (This film shows us another dimension of life that we think we know. We discover what we already know and what we are about to learn.)
- “Pulp Fiction”. (We must stay in control of life so that we don’t suffer all the time.)”
 
Proper use of rhetoric
“My primary objective is to share my experiences. I teach young climbers, I organize slideshows. I write about rock climbing and mountain safety. I am a mountain guide, and I design an educational curriculum for alpine instructors. It’s a great honor for me to share my knowledge with others and to learn at the same time.”
 
Patience, faith, tranquility and consistency
“In five years, my life will not be very different. I will continue to take advantage of my good fortune, take the necessary turns and make the right choices based on my instinct, and to share with the people that I love. If I had no limits for example, I would go back in time, take Guy Lacelle by the hand and I would choose an ice route that we would climb together and that he would list as one of his favorites. Guy Lacelle is the master who introduced me to ice climbing.”
 
Aljaz’s anecdote
“Many of my climbing stories have one thing in common: a car accident. There must be a reason but perhaps I should just be thankful for the luck I have in the mountains because, in the end, crashing cars is not a high price to pay. The result is that there is a reputation following me that it is less stressful to go climbing with me than to get in the car with me.”

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Antony Lamiche

Tony Lamiche profile - Photo © Stephan Denys
Tony Lamiche profile - Photo © Stephan Denys

France

FRA
header
Photo portrait: 
Tony Lamiche profile - Photo © Stephan Denys
Date de naissance: 
15 July 1977
Lieu de résidence: 
Hautes-Alpes, France
Formation: 
ENSA, mountain guide, ski and climbing instructor
Statut actuel: 
professional climber, mountain guide
Date d'entrée dans le Team Petzl: 
2001

A need for freedom and pure air
“My star sign is Cancer. I have my head in the clouds. My life is a constant search for physical and mental well being in the natural environment, with passionate people who exude energy. I like to share beautiful stories through photo and film, with joy and good humor. In terms of activities, bouldering is my guiding line, but climbing at crags and in the mountains have always been an important part of my life. Climbing is the most natural form of movement that exists. It’s thanks to my climbing that I live in the most beautiful places in the world endlessly discovering and meeting… I am hooked on climbing, all of it makes me happy. Skiing also, because powder skiing is an instant pleasure. In short, what I like the most and what I’m best at are bouldering, skiing and eating.”

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Like a Zen garden
“My favorite places are bouldering spots because they have a truly unique energy; Rockland in South Africa is a good example. It’s a little bit like a magnet that attracts fitness and joy. Discovering these wild places and meeting good people is pure happiness for me.”
 
 
 
My life style can be defined in one word: free
“My network is comprised of climbers, mountaineers and freeriders. I feel close to passionate people, people who wake up in the morning with desire. The people I work with are people I feel good being with. It’s simple. The climber who inspires me the most is Philippe Ribière (Petitou). The person who has touched me the most, literally as well as figuratively, is my wife. We share everything. If I was not a professional boulderer right now, I would be a professional skier or carpenter.”
 
 
 
My objective in life is to communicate through the most beautiful images possible
“The only thing I’m missing is time. I can’t accomplish everything. I’d like to be a sports genius so that I could better understand my body and move more easily. The perfect day would start with fresh oranges for breakfast, then bouldering – I’d be happy with sandstone or granite – then biking without going too far into the red zone, then a little bit of skiing at sunset,followed by a good night amongst friends.”
 
 
 
Tony’s anecdote
“Success or failure means almost nothing. Sometimes you have to force destiny. The day I tried “The Fly” (New Hampshire, Quebec), I almost succeeded on the second try but bad weather,poor fitness… But one morning at the end of the trip – it was time to leave for another area – I woke up motivated. So just before going to the airport I took the car and went back for one last try – I sent it.”
 
 

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Diaporama Photos: 
Diaporama Videos: 

 
 

 
 
Video playlist featuring Tony Lamiche