Petzl SHUNT

PictoContext:

Since 1999 Petzl has provided specific information regarding the special use of the Petzl SHUNT as a back-up device for industrial rope access. Petzl required that users must have received and mastered IRATA (Industrial Rope Access Trade Association) training or similar and must also use the Petzl SHUNT within the current "IRATA method".

Extract from the June 2009 statement:
"Professional operatives who choose to use the Petzl Shunt as a rope-access and work-positioning back-up device must have received and mastered IRATA training or similar, and must use the Petzl Shunt with IRATA method. Responsibility for this remains with the employer and the user."

 

PictoAnalysis:

  • In the light of incidents and accidents, indicative tests have been conducted, including – but not limited to – a workshop in March 2011 with rope-access experts present. The findings of these indicative tests demonstrate that releasing a towing cord while towing a Petzl Shunt as a back-up device is not consistently effective:
    - In an emergency situation, the natural human reflex is to increase the grip on the cord, therefore reducing the likelihood that the cord will be pulled from the hand.
    - Additionally, this natural reflex may override any conscious action to open the hand and release the cord.
    - Consequently, either of these hazards could result in overriding the braking function of the Petzl Shunt.
  • Following these tests, working sessions with IRATA alerted Petzl to the fact that there has not been special training sufficient to minimize this potential risk. Testing and experience demonstrates that human response to emergency situations, even among expert users and highly trained professionals, is not completely predictable.

 

PictoConclusions:

  • Previous Petzl statements required special training for this specific use of the Petzl Shunt. The lack of any described methods or special training therefore makes these previous Petzl statements obsolete.
  • As a measure of precaution, Petzl recommends to NOT use the Petzl Shunt, while towed by a cord, as a back-up device in rope access.

This statement supersedes all previous statements and communications relating to this particular use of the Petzl Shunt.

 

Frequently asked questions.

Referring to the Petzl January 2012 Statement regarding the use of the Petzl Shunt as an industrial rope-access back-up device while towed by a cord.

1. Does this statement apply to sport use?
2. Does this new Petzl information affect me?
3. Why have Petzl changed their point of view regarding their previous statements?
4. The company I work for issues its workers with Petzl Shunts and towing cords. What should I do?
5. Do I need to stop work?
6. How much time do I have in order to change my system of work?
7. What can I do if I need to change my current back-up system?
8. Do I need to re-think my rescue plans?
9. What about the use of a Petzl Shunt as a back-up device for two-person use or for those technicians over 100kgs?
10. How long is this new statement valid?
11. Are the original Petzl Statements still valid?
12. Are the original Petzl Statements valid during this transition period?
13. Has IRATA published any information relating to this important topic?
14. Were IRATA consulted during the production of this new Petzl statement?
15. Why did Petzl release this new statement nine months after the indicative tests?
16. I have just bought Petzl Shunts based on the June 2009 Petzl statement. Can I return them?
17. Can I continue to use the Petzl SHUNT in rope access?
18. Can I use the Petzl SHUNT outside of the Technical Notice?
19. Can I continue to use the SHUNT in the same technique, just without the towing cord?

 

1. Does this statement apply to sport use?
No. This content only applies to the use of the Petzl Shunt in industrial rope-access situations. This content does not apply to sport uses as described in the Technical Notice.
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2. Does this new Petzl information affect me?
If you or your company uses Petzl Shunts as part of an industrial rope-access back-up system, then you are affected by this information.
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3. Why has Petzl changed their point of view regarding their previous statements?
Previous Petzl statements required special training for this specific use of the Petzl Shunt. In 2011, Petzl discovered three important points through tests and also during working sessions with IRATA:

  • In an emergency situation, the natural human reflex is to increase the grip on the cord, reducing the likelihood that the cord will be pulled from the hand. Additionally this natural reflex may override any conscious action to open the hand and release the cord. Consequently, either of these hazards could result in overriding the braking function of the Petzl Shunt.
  • There is a lack of any described methods or special training for this specific back-up technique.
  • Further, it was agreed that any training to overcome this natural reflex is not currently possible or justifiable.

In light of these three points, as a measure of precaution, Petzl’s duty was to alert and inform the community of these hazards.
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4. 5. and 6. The company I work for issues its workers with Petzl Shunts and towing cords. What should I do? Do I need to stop work? How much time do I have if I need to change my system of work?

  • Contact the person responsible for rope access in your company and check that they have seen and understand the requirements of the Petzl January 2012 statement. Ask if they have an existing risk analysis document covering the points raised, and if there are any special measures which need to be taken.
  • Users may wish to implement a transition period towards improving their back-up system. It is expected that the employers will:
    - Inform all users of this information.
    - Perform a detailed risk analysis while taking account of available information concerning this method of use, including Technical Instructions.
    - Create and communicate to their employees an action plan for any required changes in accordance with the hazards identified by the risk analysis and any identified control measures.
    This action plan will specifically detail any timeline.
  • Throughout this timeline, the responsibility for the selection and training for use of the back-up system continues to lie with the employer, as noted in the previous Petzl documents.
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7. What can I do if I need to change my current back-up system?
As a reminder, back-up systems will always have compromises. It is possible to reduce the likelihood of an incident occurring, but it cannot be entirely excluded. Alternative solutions may include the following:

  • Use a different back-up system:
    - Rope-adjustment device to EN12841 A or fall-arrest device to EN353-2, as applicable for the rope-access task. For example, the Petzl ASAP – including, if required or for rescue, an appropriate lanyard.
    - An independently anchored EN360 automatic device.
    - Use of an independent system adapted to the situation. For example, consider airbags for low-clearance working, nets or a secondary vertical fall-arrest system.
  • Change the technique: For example, independent movement of the Petzl Shunt and the descending device. Warning: this method does not eliminate all potential risks – it can reduce likelihood, but requires vigilance, supervision and training. It does not exclude the issue of releasing the cord while manipulating the Petzl Shunt. If the Petzl Shunt is used with a lanyard, then this use falls outside the manufacturer’s instructions. Consider carefully the realistic use of this method during long descents or with loads over 100kg.

Reminder: The employers and users take the final responsibility to fully analyze the associated risks and to train in all aspects of use of these possible solutions.
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8. Do I need to re-think my rescue plans?
You must verify that your rescue plans provide an effective back-up system for a two-person load, if this is an anticipated method of rescue, and that all equipment is adapted for this use. First, consider other methods of rescue which remove or minimize the need for two-person loads.
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9. What about the use of a Petzl Shunt as a back-up device for two-person use or for those technicians over 100kgs?
In the June 2009 Petzl statement regarding the use of the Petzl Shunt as a rope-access back-up device, the following information was given, which remains relevant:
"Use of the Petzl Shunt as a back-up device for loads greater than one person has not been tested by Petzl, and requires careful consideration by the operator: analysis of rope type and condition, compatibility of the rope with the Petzl Shunt in this situation of extra loading, etc. In this specific situation, it remains the
user’s responsibility to check rope/Petzl Shunt performance. Other devices are currently available which are more suited to this task.
In 2005 Petzl introduced the Petzl ASAP mobile fall arrest device for use with a single EN1891 low-stretch rope. The Petzl ASAP is appropriate in many rope-access situations, including two-person rescues, and is approved to EN353-2 and EN12841 type A."
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10. How long is this new statement valid?
It is valid until further notice.
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11. and 12. Are the original Petzl documents still valid? Are the original Petzl documents valid during any transition period?
The previous documents from Petzl relating to this topic explain the need for specific training. The Petzl SHUNT was specified and used as a rope-access back-up device solely according to the training made available by the employer and the employer’s risk analysis, because such use is not included in the Petzl Shunt instructions for use.
The previous statements from Petzl have not taken the place of the instructions for use. They give more information for the user, explaining the potential risks associated with this particular use. The Petzl January 2012 statement supersedes all previous documents concerning this topic, from its date of publication.

The employers and users, however, must take the final responsibility for the selection and use of all work equipment.

The Petzl January 2012 statement comes as a result of product and user experience, which is evolving continuously. In addition, please read question 6, above.
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13. Has IRATA published any information relating to this important topic?
IRATA is currently creating guidance information specifically for their members, which will be presented on their website and relates to the use of the Petzl SHUNT as a rope-access back-up device when towed by a cord.
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14. Was IRATA consulted during the production of this January 2012 Petzl statement?
Yes, Petzl was invited to meet with members of the IRATA Executive Committee and their Technical Coordinator on a number of occasions since September 2011, in order to discuss the subject and identify any issues that may prevent a technician from working during any period. Communications have been regular between IRATA and Petzl with regard to technical questions and information, and this communication continues.
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15. Why did Petzl release this new statement nine months after the indicative tests?
In September 2011, Petzl sent an official letter to IRATA, requesting a response and action after having learned about these indicative tests. IRATA then invited Petzl to be involved in working sessions, in order to achieve a joint communication to alert users of the hazards surrounding this specific use of the Petzl SHUNT as a back-up device in rope access. This process ended in mid December 2011.
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16. I have just bought Petzl Shunts based on the June 2009 Petzl statement. Can I return them?

If the Petzl Shunts are unused, YES ! Please contact your local Petzl distributor for further information.

If the Petzl Shunts are already in service, NO! The employers and users take the final responsibility for the selection and use of all work equipment. Until the publication of the January 2012 statement, the Petzl Shunt was used and was specified according to the special training made available by the employer. The Petzl January 2012 statement comes as a result of product and user experience, which is evolving continuously.
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17. 18. and 19. Can I continue to use the Petzl SHUNT in rope access? Can I use the Petzl SHUNT outside of the Technical Notice? Can I continue to use the SHUNT in the same technique, just without the towing cord?

The likelihood of not releasing an attached towing cord is covered in the Petzl January 2012 statement, but of course other foreseeable events exist and some are
explained in the Petzl SHUNT Technical Notice :

  • The distinct hazard of grabbing or holding the SHUNT is explained, as it results in overriding the braking function of the SHUNT.
  • Towing the SHUNT without a cord increases the likelihood of grabbing the device.
  • This possibility is greatly increased with the use of a lanyard connection between harness and SHUNT because this moves the SHUNT into a position more likely to be reflex grabbed by a user. In addition it can increase the height of the fall and the possibility of grabbing the rope just above the SHUNT. It is for these exact reasons that the use of the SHUNT with a lanyard is crossed out in the Technical Notice.

Using the Petzl SHUNT outside the recommendations of the January 2012 Petzl Statement or outside the Petzl Technical Notice requires a thorough risk analysis of the specific use, must consider all available information (including the Technical Notice) and is under the full responsibility of the user. As in all cases, the user accepts full responsibility for any use which is not included in a manufacturer’s Technical Notice.
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Kommentare

Petzl Shunt

I have been a member of IRATA since 2002, and trained with "Petzl Shunt" as a back up device and still do!

With thanks to my trainer in 2002 who trained me to have a short cord attached to my shunt for the same reason you have issued this statement! The cord attached to my shunt is only long enough for me to use my thumb and forefinger??

Because of my training i have tried to remind others of the down fall of having to long cord.

Is this statement a call for "Rope Techs" to stop using the Shunt.

At the time sending this comment! No Safely Release has been issued by IRATA.

Kev Wilkinson
Rope Access Technician
UK

Re : Petzl Shunt

Hello,

Our statement is first an alert about existing hazards and as a consequence Petzl do not recommend the use of the shunt as a back up device with towing cord and lanyard, expect further information from IRATA.

Sincerely

Use of Shunt

I am an IRATA level 3 trainer and still much prefer using a shunt as a back-up device than any other device I have used. I have personally know four operatives who have cut through their working lines and the Shunt has worked perfectly. I have viewed your memo to Irata following the assessors workshop where the Shunt to critically reviewed. It refers to a knotted towing cord. Of course it is hard to relsease a knotted cord. I have been an IRATA technician for twelve years and have know not to have have a knot in the towing cord, since I started.

Due to the current perception that the Shunt is an un-safe device, I am now forced to use an ASAP which training. As the Asapsorber is only rated for one person,an absorica must be used. Due to the short length of the Absorbica it is nothing but a complete nuisance whist carrying out technican rescues.I am quite happy to continue using a Shunt as my back-up device and use it on a daily basis operationally. Just in normal abseil use, the towing cord slips through my fingers at least 4 or 5 times a day. Provided a short 3mm cord with no knot is used, I deem the Shunt to be the most practical back-up device currently available.

I welcome you comments.

Still the best

I am also an IRATA Level 3 Trainer and i have been following this whole saga slowly unfolding for years now. Sure the shunt has its shortfalls but Petzl have always said that it requires correct and sufficient training.
The Shunt is extremely reliable, takes all the abuse from an industrial environment but as long as the operative is fully trained in ALL its bad points it is still the most gentle device on the ropes and i have witnessed two people fall 3 metres onto a shunt which saved them and proved to me how good it is.
Recently while working in the Danish sector one of my technicians (Dan Junge Shønemann) lost the towing string and attached a small tie wrap (5mm wide+/-) in its place. I made fun of it but later tried it for myself. It works!! It must be a small one and i would play about with the length (probably around 4cm long) but it is very hard to hold on to i.e. slips out very easily and is durable and neat! Brilliant.
In conclusion - i have used the shunt since 1988 but what is worrying me is the trend to 'engineer' out idiots with more idiot proof devices rather than have highly trained technicians that have a better aptitude and technical ability in the system.

Still the best

Fully agree with this post. The famous saying of "the simple ideas are the best". The shunt fits this saying to a tee. Great piece of kit that encourages safe working practises when used as it should be. I fully encourage awareness training of the shut. Lets hope this shunt is still here in 100 years time.

Re Still the best

Hello Jason,

A principle concern is that a rope access technician's level of training is not, has not and cannot be sufficient to overcome the human reflex. 'Awareness training' is simply not enough to guarantee consistent responses in an emergency situation. Highly trained (rope access technicians), good aptitudes and technical abilities do not neccessarily guarantee predictable human responses - a key element to this issue.

Thank you for your participation.

Sincerely

Shunt!!

I have used the Shunt for passed 13 years and not found any problems with it okay we see that the companys like to promote new gadgets well i think we should look at the stastic's of the shunt and also the Stop its how the individual's use the EQUIPMENT.

I agree. Let me just say

I agree.
Let me just say that with the statement from Petzl and IRATA, and the safety issues resident to the ASAP (and now the SHUNT), my company now has no choice but to ban both of these devices for any work use. I will be looking to other companies for more suitable products, and I may even expand my search to include ascent and descent devices. The growing trend from petzl seems to be money first and safety after, I do not approve!

Shunt's

Did the possibly throw around the idea of only using the shunt in acsending application since the pull line is not in use at that point and then switching over to an ASAP for descending?

RE: Shunts

Hello Jason,

Please consult FAQ 17 for an answer.

Sincerely

Reply

I fully agree

Shunt

this subject has been ongoing now for sometime with arguments from both sides, if Petzl have sold a product that can no longer can be used for its intended purpose, are they then going to recall the product and issue refunds/ alternatives?

RE : Shunt

Hello Jason,

This specific use of the Shunt was not the intented initial use of the product. We will only refund unused products as detailed in the FAQ 16.

Sincerely

Incidents and accidents to prove the Shunt unsafe, please.

Hello.

Thank you for your interest in and dedication to safety for rope access technicians.

I have been working professionally with rock climbing for more than 30 years and with rope access for more than ten years and am presently a SPRAT, level III technician and evaluator.
During these years, I have learned the importance of systematically learning from incidents and accidents.
During all the years with professional rope access, I have thus actively been implementing and using an incident reporting system, involving ao. annual meetings with all certified personal to make sure, that all that has been changed and updated due to the experienes, learned from the incident reports, is being passed back on to the rope access technicians.
This also helps to keep the rope access technicians motivated to keep on reporting incidents and thus continually improve both safety as such and the incident reporting system, that we have in place.

Also, I am working on getting this or a similar incident reporting system implemented in SPRAT, as I believe, that it is arguably the single most important action that could be taken to keep on improving safety and to help keep technicians vigilant and alert.

In spite of all this work, I have not heard of any incidents or accidents, that could be attributed to the use of the shunt as a back-up device for rope access.

However, in your new statement on the use of the Petzl Shunt as a back-up device for rope access, you state, that the new statement to stop using the Petzl Shunt, while being towed by a cord, as a back-up device in rope access is ao. made “In the light of incidents and accidents...”.

To be able to understand the nature and seriousness of the problem and certainly also to make fair assessments on an informed background of what to do or possibly change in the future, we ask you to inform us, which specific incidents and accidents, that you refer to in relation to the use of the Shunt as a back-up device for rope access being a safety problem?
Please be specific and point us to the relevant incident- and accident reports, so we can get a realistic chance of making informed choices, before changing a hitherto seemingly safe and wellproved procedure.

Looking forward to hearing from you.
Sincerely


Christian Almer

Answer: Incidents and accidents

Hello Christian,

Thank you for your comment. Concerning incidents and accidents please consult and download the following notices on the IRATA website :

Go to this page :
http://irata.org/safety_notices.htm

and download

http://irata.org/safety_notices/Safety%20Bulletin%2021.1%20-%20Rescue%20...

http://irata.org/safety_notices/Safety%20Bulletin%2017%20-%20Abseil%20in...

Sincerely

All backup devices are a compromise

The shunt may have some limitations, as all current backup devices do. Petzl have now invested in a new device, the ASAP, and from a safety and sales point of view will want users to buy the ASAP.
However the ASAP is also flawed, and unsuitable for many work situations. These flaws are well documented.
If Petzl wish to continue manufacturing and selling the shunt, then they should list any cautions they have and trust their potential customers to make a choice about which device, Petzl or otherwise, they would like to use. If they no longer have confidence in the shunt then they should cease production and issue a recall notice.
Their current position will appear to most customers as a Microsoft style "forced upgrade" to a significantly more expensive product. If a well designed and 100 percent reliable backup device was available on the market, most companies and operatives would switch to it without any of these strongarm tactics.

SHUNT safety

Could you please clarify these statements

Change the technique:
For example, independent movement of the Petzl Shunt and the descending device.
It does not exclude the issue of releasing the cord while manipulating the Petzl Shunt. If the Petzl Shunt is used with a lanyard, then this use falls outside the manufacturer’s instructions.

1. If the Shunt in the situation described is not on a Lanyard (cowstail) how is it attached?

and how does that align with the suggestion by IRATA that:

"For 2 person rescue training if the Shunt is to be used it must be attached to a flexible device lanyard (dynamic cowstail) of no longer than 60cm (including connectors) if attached from the waist D ring or 40cm (including connectors) if attached to the sternal or chest attachment point. The Shunt must not be positioned lower than the top of the descending device during a two person rescue."

2. I fail to see how an operator descending on a RIG (for example) managing the SHUNT cord and the RIG handle that controls their descent with the same hand could possibly grip the cord hard enough to prevent it functioning in the event of a problem with the RIG or mainline that could cause it's engagement. Maybe I am wrong?

RE : Shunt SAfety

Hello Down Under,

In reply to your first question :
For both of these points - i.e. independant movement and 2 person rescue training please refer directly to IRATA, as these methods of use are proposed in the IRATA statement and not by Petzl.

In reply to your second question :
Please read the IRATA safety bulletins published on their website. Particularly of interest will be an incident described in safety bulletin 'SB 17'. In this incident, the injured person was using a Petzl I'D descender in combination with a Petzl Shunt towed by a cord. It does not require a great force to tow an unloaded Petzl Shunt, irrespective of the descending device it is being used alongside.

Thank you for your participation in the comments of our website.

Sincerely

Hello, could you please

Hello, could you please explain to me why it is that Petzls statement: 'As a measure of precaution, Petzl recommends to NOT use the Petzl Shunt, while towed by a cord, as a back-up device in rope access.'
Has been subject to the addition of the word 'continuosly' between 'while' and 'towed' by one of IRATAs versions of the above statement.
And now seems to have been changed again to: 'IRATA has always acknowledged these risks and notes that Petzl’s recommendation is not to use the Petzl Shunt as a backup device if it is towed with a cord during continuous descent.'
I can find no evidence of Petzl referencing the 'continuous' towing of the shunt, or the use of the shunt during 'continuous' descents in its statements advising against the the use of the shunt as a back up device in rope access.
Semantics on my part, or something darker?

I have lots more questions!

Reply

Hello,

The response made by IRATA to the Petzl Statement published in January includes a number of differences to the Petzl Statement. IRATA have also published a Frequently Asked Questions document, which may help. We suggest that you contact IRATA directly for any further clarification, and in order to discuss your other questions where they relate to this topic.

As a reminder, the Petzl Statement concludes with;

"As a measure of precaution, Petzl recommends NOT to use the Petzl Shunt as a back up device in rope access whilst towed by a cord."

Sincerely

Re-design maybe?

I have been selling, using and training with Shunts & other Petzl devices for over 20 years. Every time you show a Shunt or Gri-Gri to somebody that have not used it before you remark about the simplicity of the devices. Well done on that et merci beaucoup.

Now, please tell me, with all this mumble-jumble circus that has been going on surrounding the Shunt, that Petzl is in the process of coming up with an upgraded, "safer" version of the Shunt? Surely it is time?

I'll place an order for the Shunt II right now. And if you need a hand making the shunt better & safer, there are some ideas out there...

Regards, Gustav

Redesign

Hello. Thanks you for your feedback. We don’t plan to upgrade the SHUNT. Nowadays the product ASAP is recommended. Thanks for your confident in the PETZL products. All the best


This is great. The training

This is great. The training was of no use and a waste of time.

Petzl Shunt

Hi I am a Level 1 Rope tech in Australia, i have being trained with the ASAP and shunt, both have there uses. I have used the shunt in training and had the fear of God put into me by the instructor, now i am a confident user and follow the rules stringently whilst using the shunt. I also keep it tight so i reduce the shock load if i happen to fall. I also have used ones that had a knot in the end and NO knots, the knotted ends freaked me out as they didn't slip thru fingers easily. I use the shunt for my main backup device and for weekend work, on the sides of cuttings and the ASAP on the side of buildings, as the shunt is easier to clean and service after getting dirty. I also run a RIG descender.

So the shunt can be used as long as the rules are followed stringently! I know we are all human and get lazy and complacent!

If Petzl wish to continue

If Petzl wish to continue manufacturing and selling the shunt, then they should list any cautions they have and trust their potential customers to make a choice about which device, Petzl or otherwise, they would like to use. If they no longer have confidence in the shunt then they should cease production and issue a recall notice.

Re

Hello Rodrik and thanks for your comments.
One of our principle goals is to explain the proper uses and also the foreseeable hazards and misuses of our products and solutions in our technical notices and other information - such as our product experience available on petzl.com. This information is provided explicitly so that the user can make informed choices as to which solution may be the most appropriate for them. Each technical notice explains clearly that this choice and the responsibility for use remains with the user.

The Petzl statement published in January 2012 relating to the use of the Petzl SHUNT in rope access explains that, in Petzl's view, it is the methods of use which may not be predictable and not the Petzl SHUNT.

Sincerely

Petzl Shunt.

Hello everyone.
I,m an Irata trained level 1 from The Netherlands. Trained with ASAP and Shunt. After not working so much in Irata i decided to go up in the trees using the Irata techniques. Seeing other treeclimbers going up on one rope and using a prussik knot,
installing an extra flipline around the worksite while sawing of a branch, i thought
why climbing with one rope after you,ve done Irata?? I climb with two ropes now, walking up the tree and using two shunts instead of one prussik knot and one rope.
I use the shunts as assenders and to possition myself at the worksite. Comming down
i change over to a Petzl Stop on one of the lines and the other stays on Shunt.
(A Prussik knot will wear and burn through after so many runs downwards). Finally, i
will cut of the little Knot at the end of the little string attached to my Shunts.
Thank you for this Safetyflash. Its very worthwhile reading it. Yours Sincerely.
Ron Spanjer.

RE

Hello Ron,
Methods of access into trees vary widely but in many cases the use of a single system depends on your risk analysis and local legislation. Using a secondary or even a third system during cutting or other operations is often obligatory. We would suggest attending specific and recognised treeclimbing training and make sure that you have considered all the hazards associated with this particular type of work. An example may be to consider your immediate descent at any point during your ascent. This may be more possible with a simple prussik or other device than with systems such as you decribe. Be certain that the other technicians you are working with fully understand your techniques and that you also understand theirs.
Enjoy the trees.
Sincerely

Petzl Shunt

Hi Petzl, Please stop all this confusion & stop making the shunt & take it off the shelves. But a recall of this equipment would cost you £M`s........
I have used the shunt for over 15 years & have had no problems with it or anyone I have worked with, due to the training & not having the tail too long or with a knot.
It all seams to be down to a piece of string that if to long, or with a knot in it, would make it easier to hold onto for dear life & could end it for you as you bounce on to the floor / structure...
So make something, with the help of thousands of rope techs out there, you should be able to come up with something better than the ASAP......
All the best Jim.....

can we use SHUNT as a back up while rappeling in caves

A question?
Is it OK to use SHUNT in caving activities?
Can We use SHUNT as a back up while rappeling in caves?

Re: can we use SHUNT as a back up while rappeling in caves

Hello Saeed,

The product is not designed for such use. And looking at the muddy environnement and the fact that ropes can become very dirty in caves, the wear of the product could be very fast.
Sincerely

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